Windows 8

Windows 8 is a personal computer operating system developed by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems, with an emphasis on improving its user experience on tablets. In particular, these changes included a touch-optimized Windows shell based on Microsoft's "Metro" design language, the Start screen, a new platform for developing apps with an emphasis on touchscreen input, integration with online services, support for USB 3.0, Advanced Format hard drives, near field communications, and cloud computing. Additional security features were introduced, such as built-in antivirus software, integration with Microsoft SmartScreen phishing filtering service and support for UEFI Secure Boot on supported devices with UEFI firmware.

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Speaker unmuted and muted
In a question here at Experts Exchange, a member was looking for "a little app that would allow sound to be turned OFF and ON by simply clicking on an icon in the system tray". This article shows how to achieve that, as well as providing the same OFF/ON audio muting toggle via a single keystroke.
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by:John
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Thanks for posting this, Joe.  My own ThinkPad has a mute button and I use it so much my finger is trained to it.
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVE
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You're welcome, John, and thanks to you for the feedback and the article endorsement — both very much appreciated! Regards, Joe
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Cloud Class® Course: MCSA MCSE Windows Server 2012
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Cloud Class® Course: MCSA MCSE Windows Server 2012

This course teaches how to install and configure Windows Server 2012 R2.  It is the first step on your path to becoming a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE).

Windows 10
When you start your Windows 10 PC and got an "Operating system not found" error or just saw "Auto repair for startup" or a blinking cursor with black screen. A loop for Auto repair will start but fix nothing. You will be panic as there are no backup of your document. How can you fix the problem?
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by:harry for
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well addressed !
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by:Littleman
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In addition, the first thing that you should do is chkdsk c: /r
and let that scan. Usually the damage is from windows shutting down incorrectly and corrupting the hard drive or files on the drive. The rest if that may not be necessary. If that fails, then proceed to the mbr repair.
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OfficeMate Freezing Error
OfficeMate Freezes on login or does not load after login credentials are input.
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The recent Microsoft changes on update philosophy for Windows pre-10 and their impact on existing WSUS implementations.
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Today, still in the boom of Apple, PC's and products, nearly 50% of the computer users use Windows as graphical operating systems. If you are among those users who love windows, but are grappling to keep the system's hard drive optimized, then you should read this article.
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Sometimes drives fill up and we don't know why.  If you don't understand the best way to use the tools available, you may end up being stumped as to why your drive says it's not full when you have no space left!  Here's how you can find out...
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by:Brian B
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Good and useful article, but a warning to users who may read this: It is not recommended to just try and delete system files. Without going into a long explanation, if you use Lee's method above and find a lot of space being taken up by a specific directory, search on how to clean up that directory. Here is an example for one common place that files build up:
https://www.experts-exchange.com/searchResults.jsp?searchTerms=WINSXS+folder+clean+up&asSubmit=true&asSelected=true
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by:Lee W, MVP
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Brian B - EXCELLENT point - added a warning in case people read the article and not the comments.
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Detailed instructions on how to install an Access add-in in recent versions of Office and Windows (with screen shots)
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If you use NetMotion Mobility on your PC and plan to upgrade to Windows 10, it may not work unless you take these steps.
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by:William Fulks
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Thanks! My first attempt was using Windows Update. I should make a quick edit to specify that. I went through all the usual measures and they all failed until I removed NetMotion. I wasted a whole afternoon on that machine!
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I'm a big fan of Windows' offline folder caching and have used it on my laptops for over a decade.  One thing I don't like about it, however, is how difficult Microsoft has made it for the cache to be moved out of the Windows folder.  Here's how to do it.
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by:Jim Horn
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Very well written, for the complexity of the subject matter it was pretty easy to follow along.  Voting Yes.
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Desktop
No matter the version of Windows you are using, you may have some problems with Windows Search running too slow or possibly not running at all. Before jumping into how you can solve this issue, just know there are many other viable alternative desktop search options out there.
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by:Jim Horn
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Nicely illustrated and reads very well.  Voted Yes.
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Expert Comment

by:geolemon
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Great article - thanks!

I wish Microsoft would recognize the real problem they keep causing, however-

Despite ANYTHING I say, my girlfriend would rather dismiss the "Upgrade to Windows 10 for free!" notification in her task tray than actually upgrade, for fear that it'll break more than it improves...
...exactly things like this.

So also at a domestic level, thanks - this will help me avoid the "I told you so!" when I finally raise the nerve to convince her to pull the trigger on that upgrade.
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With Windows evolving further, the built-in protective mechanisms get better and better. Still, Microsoft is not very good at introducing those to the technical community. This article is about a new bitlocker functionality that could revolutionize your concept for protecting USB: SID-protectors.
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by:McKnife
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Spaces are (as usual) not allowed. Make it:
manage-bde -protectors -add -SID "domain.local\domain users" x: 

Open in new window

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Expert Comment

by:mrnine exx
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It works now!! Thank you so much for your help..
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Ever wondered why Windows 8 and 10 don't seem to accept your GPO-based software deployment while Windows 7 does? Read on.
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by:LockDown32
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Thanks McKnife. I caught the part about the fast boot. It was interesting and clear. What wasn't clear was the fix.
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by:IT Guy
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Excellent article
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Security measures require Windows be logged in using Standard User login (not Administrator).  Yet, sometimes an application has to be run “As Administrator” from a Standard User login.  This paper describes how to create a shortcut icon to launch applications with the "Run as Administrator" option.
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by:Yashwant Vishwakarma
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Good One Fred.
Voted Yes :)
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by:Senior IT System Engineer
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This is cool and useful for PCI-DSS compliant environment.
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Sometimes a user will call me frantically, explaining that something has gone wrong and they have tried everything (read - they have messed it up more and now need someone to clean up) and it still does no good, can I help them?!  Usually the standard restart will fix most ills.  In this case a restart was unproductive.  It took me a moment to figure out this was probably something fairly simple and, most likely had happened to someone else already (which meant there was likely to be a solution online).
 

The problem:


You are working on a Windows 8.x laptop and you have an experience where your screen is suddenly all sideways,

(I  will confess, up front, that the solution to this dilemma did not come to me unbidden, or even with great effort.  I googled it and found something that looked like my problem and found a way to fix it. )

001-flipped.PNGYes sideways.  Or if you have a web browser open it may look like this one:
002-flipped.PNG

Note that if your machine is anything like my laptop or the one I fixed, it has a touchpad to control the mouse.  Everything is flipped.  So right is down and left is up, while up goes to the right and down goes to the left.  
 

The Solution:


There is an easy fix (which I found here and another Microsoft link here).  The basics in this article were good enough to get me started.  My desktop did not have the checkbox (allow the screen to auto-rotate) like the one pictured here.  This seems to only exist if you have a screen that flips as in a 2-in-1.
004-screen-res-cp.PNG
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by:JustInCase
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What was not in the article is why this is happening, this functionality is not part of Windows 7, 8, 10 etc by default.
Those hot keys are part of Intel Graphic and Media Control Panel and can be disabled (it is enabled by default), or if you want you can change key sequence (not recommended).
:)Intel Hot key
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Author Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
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Didn't know that.  I will investors and amend article of necessary.
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AutoHotkey logo
AutoHotkey is an excellent, free, open source programming/scripting language for Windows. It started out as a keyboard/mouse macros product, but has expanded into a robust language. This article provides an introduction to it, with links to additional resources for EE members who want to learn more.
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Expert Comment

by:camtz
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Excellent. Thanks Joe.
Carlos
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVE
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You're welcome, Carlos, and thanks to you for the compliment. If you take a moment to click the thumbs-up icon at the bottom of the article, I''ll appreciate it — as you can see, you'll be endorsement #20. :) Regards, Joe
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The default behavior of the User Account Control (UAC) dialog is to disable (gray-out) the rest of the desktop when prompting for elevation. This is known as secure desktop. There are reasons that you may want to disable this secure desktop behavior, such as capturing a screenshot of the UAC dialog or moving one of the other open windows. There are, of course, security reasons for not changing that behavior, which is why Microsoft made Enabled the default. But if you want to disable the secure desktop behavior of the UAC dialog, here are the steps (this technique works in both Windows 7 and Windows 8):

Control Panel
Administrative Tools
Local Security Policy
Local Policies
Security Options


Scroll down to the item User Account Control: Switch to the secure desktop when prompting for elevation:


Security-options.jpg
Double-click it and you will get this dialog:


Disable-secure-desktop-when-UAC-prompts-
Tick the Disabled radio button and then OK. That's it!

To show the effect of disabling the switch to the secure desktop when prompting for elevation, I used it to be able to capture a screenshot of the UAC dialog for an article that I wrote about the Samsung SSD 840 EVO Performance Restoration Software. With the secure desktop disabled, I was able to hit the Alt-PrintScreen key to capture just the UAC dialog box:


Alt-PrintScreen-while-UAC-dialog-active.
I was also able to position on the screen both the UAC dialog and the window containing the imaging software (IrfanView) that I used to handle the screenshot. So when I hit the PrintScreen key
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Firefox seemed to slow down recently and it occurred to me that I had many open tabs — ultimately, I would find out that three-quarters of them were Experts Exchange tabs! :)

So I decided to go on a hunt for a tool that would capture the names and URLs of all open tabs and put them in a plain text file. That way I could close the tabs, thereby improving Firefox's performance, but still have a record of them in case I want to find one and resurrect it.

Enter the Send Tab URLs add-on:

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/send-tab-urls/

This Firefox add-on creates a list with the names and URLs of all open tabs in the current Firefox window. It has the ability to email the list or copy the list to the clipboard. I've never tried the email feature, as it (1) doesn't interest me and (2) is limited to 30 tabs. The copy-to-clipboard feature can handle an unlimited number of tabs — you'll see below why this is important to me. If anyone tries the email feature, please post a comment with your results.

I started using Send Tab URLs with Firefox 32.0.1 and am using it on the latest version as of this article's publication — 34.0.5. The website says that it supports English, Chinese (Simplified), Dutch, German, Hebrew, Italian, Korean, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), and Swedish, but I have used it only with the one language I know. If anyone tries it with a language besides English, please post a comment with your results.

After installing the add-on, …
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Expert Comment

by:FlyWithTheWind Marc
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This addon isn't compatible with the new version of Firefox :(
There is this other one that works just fine https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/export-tabs-urls-and-titles/
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by:Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVE
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Hi Marc,
Thanks for joining Experts Exchange today and reading my article. Yes, AE Creations said in their blog that Send Tab URLs is their least-used extension, and they have the data to back it up (copied here under "Fair Use"):
5,786 average daily users between July 2016 and July 2017, compared to 8,354 for Panic Button and 35,962 for Clippings.
Because of this, they also said that they've "decided to discontinue development of Send Tab URLs, and focus on Clippings and Panic Button."

I posted my comment at the blog in early January:
Seems that you have the hard data saying that Send Tab URLs is the least-used extension, but, for me, it's the only one from AE Creations that I use (never even heard of Clippings or Panic Button). I run Send Tab URLs often on many machines...even published an article about it that may interest you..."How to save the names and URLs of open Firefox tabs in a plain text file":


https://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/17495/

Of course, I'm extremely disappointed that you are discontinuing it. But I thank you for the more-than-a-year that I had with it, and for providing such an excellent tool at no cost. That said, I'd be happy to pay for it, and I suspect that many of your 5,000+ daily users would be, too. I urge you to reconsider your decision to discontinue it and, instead, rewrite it as a WebExtension for Firefox 57, perhaps even charging a fair price for it. Thanks, Joe

They haven't responded to my comment (or the comments from others), so it's safe to say that I did not persuade them to reconsider their decision to discontinue it.

Thank you for providing the link to the 57-compatible Export Tabs URLs by AL and letting us know that it works fine.

Welcome aboard to Experts Exchange! Regards, Joe
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The Samsung SSD 840 EVO and 840 EVO mSATA have a well-known problem with a drop in read performance. I first learned about this in an interesting thread here at Experts Exchange:


http://www.experts-exchange.com/Hardware/Storage/Hard_Drives/Q_28528522.html


Samsung recently released a fix for this problem in the form of "a new firmware and performance restoration software package for the 840 EVO and 840 EVO mSATA."


Article Update: Thanks to the heads-up from ScottCha in his comment on 15-Jul-2016, I have concluded that the "Performance Restoration Software" is no longer available at the Samsung website. While the first link below is still valid and takes you to the Tools download page, the "Performance Restoration Software" is not there. The Samsung Magician Software and the firmware updates are there, so I'm guessing that Samsung views those as the solution to the problem. If anyone reading this article has more information to offer, please post a comment.


The download for it may be found in the "Samsung SSD 840 EVO Performance Restoration Software" section at this link:


http://www.samsung.com/global/business/semiconductor/minisite/SSD/global/html/support/downloads.html


I was experiencing performance problems on a laptop with a 250 GB Samsung SSD 840 EVO running W7 Pro 64-bit. I downloaded the Samsung software from here (it's in a ZIP file):


Article Update: The two links below no longer work and I cannot find the "Performance Restoration Software" anywhere at the Samsung website. My suggestions at this point are to update your SSD's firmware and use the Samsung Magician Software, both of which are available at the link above.


http://www.samsung.com/global/business/semiconductor/minisite/SSD/downloads/software/Samsung_Performance_Restoration_V11.zip


I installed it a few days ago following the instructions in the Samsung Performance Restoration v.1.1 Introduction and Installation Guide:


http://www.samsung.com/global/business/semiconductor/minisite/SSD/downloads/software/Samsung_Performance_Restoration_v11.pdf


I encourage you to read that manual thoroughly before installation, as there are many caveats in it — see the "Precautions" and "General Limitations" sections.


A caveat of my own: When the firmware update reached the 80% completion point, I received a Windows message saying that new hardware was detected and that I should reboot. I suspect this occurred because the firmware update reached a point where Windows Plug and Play kicked in and detected the "new" drive. Unfortunately, this is not documented in the Samsung manual. I did not know if I should do the reboot at that time or wait until the firmware update completed at 100%. I opted for the latter, as I was quite sure that stopping the firmware update at 80% wasn't a good idea — and it worked out well.


I also felt protected on the decision, as I had done a clone of the SSD to an external (USB) HDD using Casper. So even if I bricked the SSD, I could get a new one and clone to it from the HDD. And that's another caveat — I strongly recommend doing a clone before undertaking any firmware update of your primary drive.


The installation on the W7 Pro 64-bit laptop with the 250 GB SSD 840 EVO worked perfectly. After a few days of use, I can say that performance is significantly improved — back to where it was when I first installed the SSD around 2.5 months ago. However, I can't be certain about cause and effect. This experience is anecdotal, not statistical. I pass it along for other EE members to consider if you are having performance problems with your Samsung SSD 840 EVO or 840 EVO mSATA.


Article Update on 17-December-2014: I ran the software again last night on a Windows 8 system, this time capturing the screens along the way for this article.


After unzipping and running the program, User Account Control (UAC) prompts for elevation:


UAC-elevation.jpg

Make sure it shows Samsung as the verified publisher. It then takes you through the setup wizard with an option to launch when completed:


Setup-welcome.jpg


EULA.jpg


Destination.jpg

Desktop-icon.jpg

Ready-to-install.jpg


Completed-and-launch.jpg

After launching, the program goes through four steps, the first being the firmware update:



Opening-screen.jpg


It provides a warning about the risk of firmware updates:



Warning.jpg

As I already mentioned earlier in the article, I recommend heeding this warning and creating a clone (or image) of the drive before running the program.


After the first step (Firmware Update), it does a timer-based automatic shutdown:


Shutdown.jpg

After the reboot, it performs Step 1:



Step1.jpg

Then Step 2:


Step2.jpg


Then Step 3:



Step3.jpg

It will say "Performance Restoration is complete." when it reaches the 100% mark:


Complete.jpg


The last dialog box simply asks if you want to close the program, which I did:


Close.jpg

One difference between this run and the previous one is that this one did not prompt for a reboot at the 80 per cent completion mark. I can't explain that. It is possibly due to a difference between W7 and W8, but I don't know.


The installation on the W8 Pro 64-bit laptop with the 250 GB SSD 840 EVO worked perfectly. After some use last night and this morning, I can say that performance has improved. However, as I stated with respect to the W7 system, I can't be certain about cause and effect. Like the previous one, this experience is anecdotal, not statistical.


If you find this article to be helpful, please click the thumbs-up icon below. This lets me know what is valuable for EE members and provides direction for future articles. Thanks very much! Regards, Joe

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Expert Comment

by:Scott C
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Getting ready to do this on my SSD this weekend and noticed that the last 2 links are no longer valid. You might want to look into them.

Great article.  Hopefully I'll get my speed back.

Thanks.
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVE
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Hi Scott,
Thanks for the alert — I didn't know that the links went bad. It's just about impossible to keep links up-to-date in a large number of published articles and videos, so I really appreciate your heads-up on this one. I'll do some research and update the article accordingly. And thanks for the compliment and the upvote — both very much appreciated! Regards, Joe

Update: After researching the Samsung website, I've come to the conclusion that Samsung no longer offers the "Performance Restoration" software. My guess is that the latest firmware update and the Samsung Magician Software are now the solution, as those links still exist. I will update the article accordingly.
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Problem
I recently had a lot of trouble with File Explorer hanging on my personal computer running Windows 8.1. It's important to note that this isn't Internet Explorer. This was happening when I attempted to access a local network location where I store videos. To clarify this solution doesn't apply to external location such as OneDrive or Google Drive, but could apply to external hard drives and Network Attached Storage.

There was an event with the following details (Event Viewer -> Windows Logs -> Application):
Faulting application name: explorer.exe, version: 6.3.9600.17249, time stamp: 0x53e160b9
Faulting module name: mfmp4srcsnk.dll, version: 12.0.9600.17238, time stamp: 0x53d0c43e
Exception code: 0xc0000094
Fault offset: 0x000000000008ed0f
Faulting process ID: 0x1f90
Faulting application start time: 0x01cfc7935d0fd638
Faulting application path: C:\WINDOWS\explorer.exe
Faulting module path: C:\WINDOWS\System32\mfmp4srcsnk.dll
Report ID: 725f13bb-3411-11e4-bebb-ac220b4da592
Faulting package full name: 
Faulting package-relative application ID: 
Searching this issue didn't throw up any useful information, just a lot of links to potentially dangerous "repair" programs. After some testing I finally discovered a fix which I hope will save people time and effort.

Solution
There are two potential fixes for this problem. The first is to reinstall the operating system, which is a pain in the posterior.

The second is to …
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Expert Comment

by:ByrneIT
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Did an elevated prompt sfc /scannow not work?
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Author Comment

by:Russell Lucas
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SFC was one of the step I took while troubleshooting, however it didn't resolve the issue.
0
Cloud Class® Course: Microsoft Exchange Server
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Cloud Class® Course: Microsoft Exchange Server

The MCTS: Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 certification validates your skills in supporting the maintenance and administration of the Exchange servers in an enterprise environment. Learn everything you need to know with this course.

With the recent demise of Windows XP support, you may be a new convert to Windows 7 or Windows 8. Or perhaps you've been on W7 or W8 for a while, but just recently acquired your first scanner for the new OS. In either case, you are likely to be very surprised by an omission in the W7 and W8 Control Panel — Scanners and Cameras.

Note: I initially wrote this article for just Windows 7 and Windows 8, but it also applies to the recently released Windows 10. Please see the two Update sections at the end of the article regarding W10.

In XP, Control Panel has the Scanners and Cameras applet:


XP Control Panel Scanners and Cameras present
It is an extremely useful utility for setting the Properties of a scanner, including Events (such as the Scan/Image button and which program to start), Network Setting (such as a fixed IP address), and Scan To Button (with or without Pin).

In W7 and W8, the Scanners and Cameras applet is missing in Control Panel:


W7-W8 Control Panel Scanners and Cameras missing
This article explains how to run Scanners and Cameras in W7 and W8. Turns out that the app is here:

C:\Program Files\Windows Photo Viewer\ImagingDevices.exe

Strange as it seems, this is Scanners and Cameras in W7 and W8! That is its location even on 64-bit W7 and W8, i.e., it is not in \Program Files (x86). I use it often enough in my document imaging work that I decided to make a shortcut for it:


Shortcut Scanners and Cameras W7-W8
You may add it to the Start menu, place it on the desktop, pin it to the taskbar, or whatever you prefer. When clicking the shortcut, you'll get the
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LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:Eric AKA Netminder
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Joe,

Congratulations; your article has been published!

ericpete
Page Editor
0
Using the Hyper-V Manager requires administrator rights. This guide shows how to add shortcuts and Start Screen tiles for normal users to quickly connect to local virtual machines rather than using the recommended Remote Desktop connection.
0

Expert Comment

by:Curtis Booker
Comment Utility
The Best I've heard it put yet

Thanks a bunch
0
OEM Activation (OA v3.0) is the latest method by which Microsoft allow their OEM distributors to supply Windows 8.x and reduce the risk of piracy of their Windows product.

Unlike previous systems such as System Locked Pre-installation (SLP) which detected the manufacturer's hardware identity string in the systemboard BIOS the actual Product Key used to activate Windows is now injected into the BIOS by the manufacturer. A UEFI based BIOS has a reserved location - the ACPI Microsoft Data Management (MSDM) table - where the key is inserted by the manufacturer from a database of unique keys supplied from Microsoft.

The idea apparently is to make reinstallation easier for the end-user who now doesn't need to worry about losing that all important 25 character Product Key - if you have hardware which contains a valid Product Key then your copy of Windows will automatically activate. Try to install on the wrong hardware and you'll be out of luck.

It also means that Microsoft can stop worrying about printing any more of these:

I'm an animated GIF - open me to see a variety of Windows CoA Stickers[Windows CoA Stickers]

So don't panic when you can't find the Certificate of Authenticity (CoA) sticker on the case of your new Windows 8.x PC - It was never there and you don't need to know what the Product Key for activation is.

Or do you ....?

The lack of any tangible proof of authenticity other than a system that runs when you switch it on may not be an issue for your average home user but perhaps …
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Author Comment

by:☠ MASQ ☠
Comment Utility
For example look at the output in the example table above.
Find where the output is "2D"
Find the same entry in your own output
Now find a Hex to ASCII conversion table
Here's an example http://www.asciitable.com/
Find "2D" under the Hex column and in the CHR column you'll find that's the equivalent of the hyphen "-" so those are the separators for the key.  
You convert the other Hex Codes the same way so:
"2D 41 42 43 44 45 2D" becomes  "-ABCDE-"

Does that help?

You could code this but for the few characters involved it doesn't take long to do it manually.
0

Expert Comment

by:sharepointDepot
Comment Utility
Hello MASQ,
thanks makes sense :)
0
I have been very hesitant about purchasing any windows 8 computers.  There are several reasons, which I am sure many of you have gone over ad infinitum.  Let me delineate my own reasons first for not adopting windows 8, and then for purchasing a Windows 8 laptop.

Why I didn't, and mostly still don't, want windows 8 computers in the workplace:

(You can also see this article I wrote about Windows 8 and the corporate Environment)

Primarily, it is the expense.  When you purchase a new windows 8 system you are only asking for trouble if you don't purchase a touchscreen along with it.  This is not like previous upgrades where you could keep your monitors, keyboard, mouse, etc, and save a ton of money by just purchasing the towers.  Yes it is possible to do, but the end users will complain and complain loudly.  I've worked with several windows 8 machines that did not have touchscreens and was extremely frustrated.

Next there is the learning curve on the part of the user and the support personnel.  You can customize windows 8 and especially windows 8.1 to look almost exactly like windows 7.  And this is what I do for most people.  Then if they express the desire to use the Metro interface more, a quick toggle can change it back.  The point is that learning to use windows 8 is NOT inconsequential for users used …
0
From time to time users may run across the need to run a program or script as an administrator.  In Windows 8 and 8.1, there are a few different ways of running these types of actions.

From the Start Screen or Apps Screen
From the start screen you are able to run a program as an administrator through two methods.  First, navigate to your program and either right-click the icon or long-press the icon (for touch users).  This will enable the app bar where you have the Run as administrator option.

app bar
For users who are fans of shortcut keys, you can use the 'Ctrl+Shift+Click" method.  While holding down both the Ctrl and Shift keys, click on the program that you wish to run as administrator.

From the Desktop
From the desktop Screen you are able to invoke the run as administrator option through context menu.  First, you will right-click or long-press (for touch users) to bring up the context menu.  From the context menu, select the run as administrator option, notated by the blue and yellow shield icon, the User Account Control (UAC) icon.

desktop
From the Taskbar
From the taskbar you are able to use the run as administrator option through two methods.  First, right-click on a program to enable the jump list.  Once the jump list is in view, right-click on the program in the jump list menu to bring up the context menu. From the context menu, select the run as administrator option, notated …
2
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Expert Comment

by:McKnife
Comment Utility
Allow the comments: you show no elevation on the command line. runas has nothing to do with elevation - it would only elevate if the built-in administrator account would be used. For command line elevation, elevate the command prompt itself OR rightclick the script ->"run as administrator", or use elevate: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/2007.06.utilityspotlight.aspx (still the same for win 8.1).
Also you should include the task scheduler as another way of elevating code interactively.
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There have been a lot of blogs and articles written about windows 8 and its' pros and cons (although it didn't make it to procon.org).  The biggest problems and longest discussions we have about Windows 8/8.1, when it comes to computers in the workplace, concerns the use of touchscreens.

The first problem is that now one needs to buy a new monitor to fully exploit Windows 8.x.  Touchscreens are not inexpensive and there is not a good way to financially explain their necessity.  Windows 8.x seems to be Windows 7 on steroids.  8 has a new interface (metro) that works best with a touchscreen and enhanced security.  8 also makes it significantly more difficult to get to the various nuts and bolts of the windows operating system that we, as the "technical goto" people are used to using.

Not only do touchscreens cost more (you can't just buy a new tower - you need the new screen now), but the paradigm of how we use computers has shifted from being more of an input by keyboard experience to a tactile experience.  

Our office has considered many things when contemplating upgrading to windows 8.x.  For instance, users need to know that there is no viable upgrade path from Windows XP (yes XP since most of my users refuse to move to 7) to Windows 8.x.  It really requires not only new hardware, but in many cases new software.  The cost can be prohibitive.  This is especially true when you are looking at 100s of relatively old XP machines.  Almost all of them are not even …
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Windows 8

Windows 8 is a personal computer operating system developed by Microsoft as part of the Windows NT family of operating systems, with an emphasis on improving its user experience on tablets. In particular, these changes included a touch-optimized Windows shell based on Microsoft's "Metro" design language, the Start screen, a new platform for developing apps with an emphasis on touchscreen input, integration with online services, support for USB 3.0, Advanced Format hard drives, near field communications, and cloud computing. Additional security features were introduced, such as built-in antivirus software, integration with Microsoft SmartScreen phishing filtering service and support for UEFI Secure Boot on supported devices with UEFI firmware.