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trying to restore a pc using the HP disks.  Drive erased but then its prompting for windows 7 home edition.  Pc next cd supplied is windows 7 professional.  How do i get this version installed?
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LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:Brian B
You have entered this as a post. You might get more response if you ask it as a question.
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LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Wayne88
And your point is?  Nobody is complaining when Echelon spy on everyone else.
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Just coming to the end of patching one Site, all servers up to date.... Thanks to the use of FREE Ivanti Patch for Windows, that the Customer will be placing an order very soon with Ivanti!

https://www.ivanti.com/

BEFORE

BEFORE
AFTER

AFTER
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LVL 121
We use a lot of different products, SCCM, PRTG, Solarwinds, Tivoli....
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LVL 121
2017-06-16-00_52_37.png
Need to discuss with the business, high patch count still required is because of an old sharepoint server (old copy of office installed on server) and SQL on 2003 server, which should have been retired, but is still on and being used because data has not been migrated.

Also a Print Server we cannot update with 99 patches missing!
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and iVanti patches Windows XP and Windows 2003! for all those that have not migrated it yet!
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How can I give someone permission to map a drive to some of my server files without giving them permissions on the server? Windows Server 2008 R2 IIS 7.0
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LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:Brian B
You should be able to specify permissions just on the folders they are accessing.

But if you need any further help, I would suggest you ask this as a question. You put it in as a post, so many Experts will not see it.
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LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
0
A recent post by Brian Matis motivated me to make this alternate post to see what sort of reaction others might have about these recent revelations.

A recent article on The Verge claims that "The older operating system was less vulnerable that anyone expected"

Windows XP computers were mostly immune to WannaCry

Another article from the same source claims "Windows XP was ‘insignificant,’ researchers say" with regards to helping the WannaCry outbreak spread.

"Almost all WannaCry victims were running Windows 7"

Lots of folks (from their perspective) with a genuine need to keep running on Windows XP suffered a lot of grief in Tech forums as being one of the root causes of giving WannaCry a platform to spread and thrive from, yet now it appears all the criticism may have been a little premature and unjustified.

For the record, I personally don't condone anyone using unsupported operating systems and actively encourage everyone I deal with to get themselves up to date, but I am also sympathetic to those who feel they have a genuine need to do that, so also think they shouldn't be …
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LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:Thomas Zucker-Scharff
We have too many XP computers at my institution (some with only SP2) - mostly due to budgets and instrumentation.
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LVL 10

Author Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Hi Thomas,
Have you considered purchasing an XP Updates agreement with Microsoft? Might be an easier solution if budget restraints prevent you from upgrading? I wouldn't feel comfortable with a lot of XP machines in an environment as it would be a case of when, not if, it will come back to bite you.  Patches are available, just at a cost.

Incidentally, SP3 for XP is still provided by Microsoft - why not install it?

Steps to take before you install Windows XP Service Pack 3

How to obtain Windows XP Service Pack 3 (SP3)

Cheers..
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For all you people who turn Updates OFF.  Patch Tuesday today and miles of patches. BIG ones for Windows 10 and 7. Updates for XP and Servers. Hop to it.

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LVL 95

Author Comment

by:John Hurst
There is no issue with having manual updates and checking weekly (servers).

My barb above was aimed at people who turn updates off and leave them off. Then they come in here wondering what happened.
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LVL 121
most of our Windows 10 machines, are now being served with the Creator Update, and a new version of Windows, and if you wondered where your old files went, that are missing, from your User Profile, Documents....

check Windows.old\Users!
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Once again, security threats are prompting Microsoft to provide patches for Windows XP, which theoretically isn't supposed to be supported by them anymore. While it sucks to have to support old systems like this, it's a good call on their part. Security weaknesses in one version of Windows can weaken the entire ecosystem by allowing the spread of malicious software.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/6/13/15790030/microsoft-windows-xp-vista-security-updates-june-2017
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LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
Just read that article and was interested to read this.. "Windows XP computers were mostly immune to WannaCry"

Not that I'm condoning folks should continue to run XP of course, but I found this very interesting "Almost all WannaCry victims were running Windows 7"

Just goes to show how slack a lot of people are with regards to downloading their updates I guess.
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LVL 121
although we have plenty of clients, that had missing updates since Feb 2017, and they were not caught out!

because FIREWALLs and GROUP POLICIES, and restricted Applications!

The layered approach!
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Nice when all the major browser makers get on-board with establishing a new standard!
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ASUS X551MAV notebook Windows 8.1 64-bit - display stopped working, no bios, just black screen.  An external monitor does work with it.  Tried to download drivers from Asus website; unplugged and pressed power button for at least a minute; opened up Asus notebook to remove battery and again press power button for at least a minute.  Removed the monitor in hardware listing  and restarted.  Ran antivirus and antispyware scans.  
Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.  Thank you.
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LVL 49

Expert Comment

by:dbrunton
If the external monitor works then your display has gone.  Either the inverter or the screen or one of the components there.

Time for the repair shop.
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LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:Brian B
You have entered this as a post, which means that most Experts won't see it. You might want to resubmit as a question (use the "Ask a Question" button at the top of the page.)

Thanks,
Brian
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1
regarding Windows firewall (particularly W10 - Anniversary).
If rule is Disabled - am expecting that any data / protocol related will continue to flow.
Only if rule is Active and Blocked will blockage in/out actually occur.

Confirm???
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LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Leniart
chasster123,

Most experts will not see your questions if you use the "Post" feature.  Use the Ask a Question button instead.  See below.
Ask a QuestionYou may also like to review this link;
http://support.experts-exchange.com/customer/portal/articles/336330
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If you've ever provided Telephone or Remote support to non technically minded computer folks, I'll bet you've faced the challenge of how to get them not to type a web address you're giving them by phone into Google, Bing, Yahoo (or any other search engine they might favor) rather than enter it into a browsers address bar.

I've been using the following trick for a while and think I've managed to save some of my hair as a result!

  1. Tell them to open their favorite web browser
  2. Press CTRL + L (instruct client not to touch any other keys)
  3. Tell them to type the web address you need them to go to - like support.me

Support.me is just a web alias for the Logmein Rescue app that I subscribe to.  Do you have any favorite tricks you like using when giving telephone support? Please share them in the Comments section below.

Hit the thumbs up button if you hadn't heard of (or forgotten about) this useful shortcut :-)
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LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
I'm constantly using CTRL+SHIFT+T to recover tabs I've closed recently, and CTRL+T to open new tabs.  I'm on Chrome.
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LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
ddaaannnngggg
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Huh... this reminds me that I have an old desktop in the garage that's still running 7. Good thing I haven't turned it on in months...
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A new malware called "Adylkuzz"  was recently discovered and leverages the same hole in old Windows software used to spread WannaCry.

"The interesting thing about the Adylkuzz malware, Huss said, is that it prevented other viruses from infecting the computer it's on because it wanted to remain undetectable for as long as possible -- that means it prevented WannaCry from ransoming those computers."

http://money.cnn.com/2017/05/18/technology/windows-adylkuzz-cryptocurrency/index.html
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
Wow... viruses fighting other viruses...
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LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
A new malware ...  leverages the same hole in old Windows software

So stop the excuses, dump everything earlier than Windows 7 and Server 2008, and patch the rest. That works.

Then put in good spam filters.

People are tied to their old systems and then they wonder what happened.
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I am looking to have a script run and create a shortcut on users pc across the corporation.

This would be similar to bg info, but would be a shorcut users can double click and info would pop up into the gui windows.


MAc address pc name wirelesss ip wired ip and vpn ip.

Any Help would be great
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LVL 24

Expert Comment

by:Brian B
Hi Angelo.

I think it could be done in powershell or via policy. However, for the appropriate Experts to see this, I think you might want to submit it as a question with appropriate topics and not a post.

Thanks,
Brian
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Using 2003 or XP?  Something older?  I have little sympathy for you.  Things get old.  Software is constantly evolving and those creating it utilize new features and capabilities that (in theory) bring you more capabilities and ease of use.  It's impossible for any software developer to support everything they've ever created indefinitely.  Their abilities to continue innovating would grind to a halt.  Even for the largest of companies, like Microsoft.  They MUST cut off support at some point.  Microsoft has, it would seem, set this standard to 10 years.  Given how long that is and the advancements that can be done in 10 years, in my opinion, that is reasonable.  XP and Server 2003 are now 14+ years old.  WELL BEYOND their support life.  

Now I'm confident Microsoft doesn't actively seek to "break" their newer products ability to connect to the older, now unsupported ones, but I would say it's reasonable to EXPECT they no longer test and see if a Windows 10 computer can connect to a 2003 domain.  They MAY, at points, decide to remove functionality from 10 but I'm confident they do so to improve security.  And if that aspect that is removed happens to be the "main" way something was done in an older version that is no longer supported? Well, they warned you!

Ten years is a reasonable time frame.  If you're using what is now antiquated technology, I have little sympathy.

"Fine Lee, but what about me - I use a program that controls a device that requires it run on …
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LVL 58

Expert Comment

by:Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)
I suppose in the end that what it boils down to is whether you consider safety a function of software or not.  I would say not.  

 But if you do, the problem is in measuring how safe it is and I don't think you ever can.   You can throw a battery of tests at it, but what's safe today may not be safe tomorrow.

 On the flip side, upgrading is no guarantee of being safe either.   To use your car analogy, if my new vehicle uses a Takata air big, then I'm not very safe am I despite that I now have an air bag.  

 So do I use "safety" as a measure in the decision to upgrade or not?   I don't see how you can.

 One could even make the argument in general that by upgrading into a situation with more complexity then what I currently have, I will probably be less safe than I am now (more complexity = more potential holes).    So in regards to safety, not upgrading may be a better choice.    Sometimes, the Devil you know is better than the one you don't.  

 To wrap this up,  I don't think there are any simple answers here of course, but I don't hold it against people for not wanting to upgrade.  I also don't think software vendors should sunset support for products they release.    If someone calls me on something I wrote 15 years ago, I'm not going to say "sorry, can't support that" just because it's old and they decided to keep it.
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LVL 96

Author Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
Funny, as I was formulating my response to you yesterday, I was going to include a reference to the Takata airbag thing - any time you add new capabilities, you get more complicated and though overall safety can improve, it can also, in some circumstances, become less safe.  I believe there is a net benefit (both with airbags and with new software's increasing complexity).

I guess it depends on how you value things.  To me, safety (security) is extremely important.  And I think most people should feel that way.  As such, people need to take responsibility for their continued existence and accept how technology generally (and technology companies) generally work and the economics attached to it.
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My Windows Update was stuck at 0% downloading for about a month.  I fixed it after the WannaCry virus news on Friday by doing the following:

1. Stop the Windows Update Service
2. Delete C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\DataStore\DataStore.edb
3. Start the Windows Update Service
4. Check for updates

After that it was working fine!

As for how it got stuck in the first place... I killed the service when it started downloading and taking all my bandwidth while I was playing a game online.  Then I held a grudge against the service for a month and left it broken to teach it a lesson.
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LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
0
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This is a great thing to do, disable SMBv1 on Windows if you haven't already.

https://www.experts-exchange.com/posts/780/While-we're-all-running-around-getting-things-patched-and.html
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"Microsoft has done the right thing by making the patch available even for older, unsupported systems. But it shouldn't proactively push out the patches, as there are usually some business reasons why companies are still running old and unpatched systems," he said.

"By forcefully pushing a patch, it could do just as much harm, causing systems and applications to become unreliable."


http://www.techrepublic.com/article/why-patching-windows-xp-forever-wont-stop-the-next-wannacrypt/
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While we're all running around getting things patched and making sure our clients know how to keep from getting ransomware, let's also take a minute to disable SMBv1 as well. Patching will help this time, but you *know* someone is going to try to find another huge hole in SMBv1 to exploit. No Windows OS after Windows XP uses SMBv1, but MS had to include it in their newer OSes for compatibility. All the OSes that only use SMBv1 have been EOL for years. Let's just get future SMBv1 exploits off the table now, shall we?

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/filecab/2016/09/16/stop-using-smb1/
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Expert Comment

by:Chad Crouch
This malware really hit the world by storm! Got a lot of people in panic.
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:Brian Matis
@Chad - indeed! If there's a silver-lining to all this, it's that more people are starting to take security patching more seriously.
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Ransomware - Wannacry/wcry and everything else ...

Ransomware in general is something none of us wish to deal with.  The latest Wannacry problem is worse.  This is not because of what it is but rather of the extent to which it has affected our users.  There have been a plethora of great suggestions all over this site.  I would add to those with the following suggestions:
•      Completely check your system for viruses with a reputable virus checker
•      Check any suspected files and or links at virustotal.com
•      Make sure you have a tested versioning backup system
•      Do a complete scan of your system
•      Updates
        o      Make sure all your programs and your operating system is up to date (even old Windows OS’s now
                have updates, like windows XP – check the Microsoft website and do a windows update)
        o      If you are unable to do updates on your own machine due to company policy, make sure that your IT
                department is doing the updates.
•      Do not, click on an attachment in your email, even if it is from someone you know – call them up and check
        that they sent it – they’ll understand.

Whenever I touch a system I do a “ransomware check” which involves the following:
•      Create a blank text file called myapp.txt in the root drive (c:\) and rename it to myapp.exe
•      Run FoolishIT’s Cryptoprevent
•      Install an anti-ransomware tool such as BD Antiransomware, MBAM Antiransomware, Kaspersky
        Antiransomware for business, etc.
•      …
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LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
The overall advice to keep automatic updates on to keep updates current, keep Antivirus up to date and firewalls up to date is something we have said many times in here (sometimes to deaf ears).

Two really important points. Stop the excuses and dump all desktop operating system earlier than Windows 7 and all server operating systems earlier that Server 2008.

Second: get top notch spam filters. That is how this malware gets in.
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:Natty Greg
I can not stress enough about proxy and spam filter, content filter along with gateway antivirus scanning, patching all systems and educating users.
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WannaCry... I really wanna cry... this whole thing is insane. No, I've not been infected... nor have any of my clients. And yes, it's still possible some of my, shall I say, lesser attentive clients could be infected tomorrow or at some point in the future. But this whole thing is driving me nuts. It wouldn't be a story if IT management had taken security and patching seriously. The malware uses an exploit patched two months ago. If people patched regularly, nothing would be infected. I hate to say this - largely because the policy annoys me and has seriously inconvenienced me on more than one occasion - but this is exactly why Microsoft has started forcing Windows 10 computers to patch and reboot on a monthly (or more frequent) basis.

Let me be clear - there are thousands of new threats EVERY DAY. The way you protect yourself is by being diligent about your own security and learning to use technology / implement technology in a manner that keeps it as secure as possible. Absolute security is not possible - security itself is a balance of minimizing the threat risk and minimizing the user's inconvenience. But the way to be safe - and to protect your valuable information - is to take a tiered approach and, among other things, educate yourself/your users so they understand what to look for. Implement policies that minimize access - we're not trying to suggest your administrative assistant is untrustworthy - but do they really need access to the accounting data to do their …
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LVL 121

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
150 Countries affected and at least 250,000 devices, and $48,000 paid so far in Ransom monies!
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LVL 121

Expert Comment

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
a little bit busy at present!!!!

Layer Technologies.....

1. Anti-virus
2. Patch
3. Whitelist of apps which are allowed to run!
4. Reduce Admin rights!
1

Windows OS

102K

Solutions

129

Articles & Videos

77K

Contributors

This topic area includes legacy versions of Windows prior to Windows 2000: Windows 3/3.1, Windows 95 and Windows 98, plus any other Windows-related versions including Windows Mobile.