Windows Vista

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Windows Vista is an operating system created by Microsoft as the successor to Windows XP. It was intended for PCs, workstations and laptops, and shares the same code base as its successor, Windows 7. New features included an updated graphical user interface (GUI) and visual style dubbed Aero, a new search component called Windows Search, redesigned networking, audio, print and display subsystems, and new multimedia tools. Vista aimed to increase the level of communication between machines on a home network, using peer-to-peer technology to simplify sharing files and media between computers and devices. Windows Vista included version 3.0 of the .NET Framework, allowing software developers to write applications without traditional Windows APIs.

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How to remove "Get Windows 10" icon from the notification area (system tray) - Part 2
With the advent of Windows 10, Microsoft is pushing a Get Windows 10 icon into the notification area (system tray) of qualifying computers. There are many reasons for wanting to remove this icon. This two-part Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial series explains several techniques for doing that. In the previous Part 1, we discussed three techniques. Each of them works to remove the icon when initially performed, but some users report that the icon returns. In this Part 2, we discuss a fourth technique, which involves changing the registry. It has received no reports yet of the icon returning. We also provide a pre-built .REG file (attached in the steps below) that will easily and safely remove the Get Windows 10 icon from the notification area. Likewise, we attached another pre-built .REG file that will easily and safely restore the Get Windows 10 icon to the notification area, in the event that you want to utilize it at some point in the future.

1. Run the Registry Editor


If you prefer a safe, tested, simple, double-click method, skip to Step 6. If you prefer to modify the registry manually, follow Steps 1-5, beginning with this:

Start button
Run
regedit

Step1

2. Find the path to add a new GWX key


Expand the Registry Editor keys as follows:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE
SOFTWARE
Policies
Microsoft
Windows

Step2

3. Add a key called GWX


Click the key that you just navigated to, that is:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows

With that key selected/highlighted, click the Edit menu, then New>Key. Create a new key called GWX.

step3.jpg

4. Add a DWORD called DisableGWX

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LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Jesse Mora
Thanks for sharing this with us, this fixed the issue in seeing this annoying message not only on my personal laptop but in our company desktop and laptops as well.

Thanks once again.

Best Regards,
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
You're welcome. And thanks to you for letting me know that it worked for you — I really appreciate hearing that! Regards, Joe
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Optimize your web performance
LVL 1
Optimize your web performance

What's in the eBook?
- Full list of reasons for poor performance
- Ultimate measures to speed things up
- Primary web monitoring types
- KPIs you should be monitoring in order to increase your ROI

How to remove "Get Windows 10" icon from the notification area (system tray) - Part 1
With the advent of Windows 10, Microsoft is pushing a Get Windows 10 icon into the notification area (system tray) of qualifying computers. There are many reasons for wanting to remove this icon. This two-part Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial series explains several techniques for doing that. In this Part 1, we discuss three techniques: (i) hiding the icon, (ii) uninstalling the relevant Windows update, and (iii) disabling tasks in the Task Scheduler. They all work to remove the icon when initially performed, but some users report that the icon returns. The fourth technique, which is explained in Part 2 of the series, involves changing the registry and has received no reports yet of the icon returning.

1. Technique 1 - Hide icon


Right-click on an empty spot on the taskbar and then click Properties (or open Control Panel and run the Taskbar and Start Menu applet)

The Taskbar tab should already be selected, but if not, click it.

Step1

2. Change icon behavior from Show to Hide


Click the Customize... button.

Find the GWX entry in the list.

Click the drop-down arrow and change the behavior from Show icon and notifications to Hide icon and notifications.

Click OK.

Note: This approach works only if the check-box "Always show all icons and notifications on the taskbar" is un-ticked.

Step2

3. Technique 2 - Uninstall Windows update KB3035583


KB3035583 is the update that installs the Get Windows 10
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How to use the Windows Task Scheduler - An Introduction
The Task Scheduler is a powerful tool that is built into Windows. It allows you to schedule tasks (actions) on a recurring basis, such as hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, at log on, at startup, on idle, etc. This video Micro Tutorial is a brief introduction to the Task Scheduler. It was inspired by a recent question here at Experts Exchange from a member who wants to play a different song at four different times during the day (every day). The video uses that as the example, but the intention of the video is to explain the general creation of periodic tasks that can cover a broad range of user requirements. The video was produced in Windows 10, but the Task Scheduler user interface is nearly the same in Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 (the Task Scheduler exists in Windows XP with similar functionality, but the user interface is different).

1. Run the Task Scheduler


In Windows 10, click the Start button and start typing task scheduler. By the time you get to the letter "k", you should see the Task Scheduler choice — click it.

There are different ways to run the Task Scheduler. For example, in Windows 7:
Start
All Programs
Accessories
System Tools
Task Scheduler


Step1

2. Create a new folder for your own tasks


Make sure Task Scheduler Library is selected/highlighted in the left pane (it should already be).

Click New Folder... in the Actions pane on the right, then give the new folder a name.

Step2

3. Create a new task in your new folder


Expand the Task Scheduler Library and select/highlight your new folder.

Click Create Task... in the Actions
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Expert Comment

by:Michael Okopedeghe
Thanks very Helpful and easy to follow.
Mike
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
You're welcome, Mike. And thanks to you for joining EE today, reading my article, and endorsing it — much appreciated! Regards, Joe
0
Make Windows 10 Look Like Earlier Versions of Windows with Classic Shell
Windows 8 came with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from that interface was a Start button and Start Menu. Microsoft responded to negative user feedback of the Metro interface, bringing back the Start button and Start Menu in Windows 10. However, even though there are widespread reports that users like the Windows 10 interface better than the Windows 8 one, many users still prefer the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows XP, and even (my personal favorite) Windows 2000. This video Micro Tutorial explains how to achieve the W7, XP, or 2K interface on your Windows 10 computer with an excellent, free product called Classic Shell.
Windows 8 came with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from that interface was a Start button and Start Menu. Microsoft responded to negative user feedback of the Metro interface, bringing back the Start button and Start Menu in Windows 10. However, even though there are widespread reports that users like the Windows 10 interface better than the Windows 8 one, many users still prefer the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows XP, and even (my personal favorite) Windows 2000. This video Micro Tutorial explains how to achieve the Windows 7 or Windows XP or Windows 2000 interface on your Windows 10 computer with an excellent, free product called Classic Shell.

1. Download the installer for the software


Visit the Classic Shell website at:
http://www.classicshell.net/

Click the Download Now
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Expert Comment

by:Ramin
Very Good Tutorial.
0
 
LVL 54

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi Ramin,
Thank you for the compliment — I really appreciate it! Regards, Joe
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Move the Taskbar to Create Additional Vertical Screen Space
In this video, we discuss why the need for additional vertical screen space has become more important in recent years, namely, due to the transition in the marketplace of 4x3 computer screens to 16x9 and 16x10 screens (so-called widescreen format). We then explain how to increase the vertical screen space by moving the taskbar off the bottom of the screen to the left side of the screen. We show this in Windows 7, but the technique also works in XP, Vista, and Windows 8.

1. Access the Taskbar Properties.

There are two ways to access the Taskbar Properties.

The first is to right-click in an open space on the taskbar, which brings up a context menu. From the context menu, select "Properties" and this will show all options related to the Taskbar (and Start Menu).

Alternatively, the easier way to get to the Properties is via your Control Panel. Open Control Panel and select the "Taskbar and Start Menu" applet. This will show the same options as the first method.
context menu

2. Try out the Auto-hide feature.

Auto-hide will allow the Taskbar to hide when you are not near it.

To enable this feature, tick the "Auto-hide the taskbar" box in Properties and click "Apply". Move the mouse towards the bottom of the screen to see how distracting Auto-hide is (and why many users don't like it).

After trying it, un-tick the "Auto-hide the taskbar" box in Properties and click "Apply" again.

auto-hide

3. Review the time and date display by hovering the mouse over the time on the far right side of the Taskbar.

This shows the day of the week and date in a pop-up bubble. This functionality will change once we move our Taskbar to the left.
date and time

4. Return to your Taskbar Properties.

2
Cloning a Hard Drive with Casper
This video Micro Tutorial explains how to clone a hard drive using a commercial software product for Windows systems called Casper from Future Systems Solutions (FSS). Cloning makes an exact, complete copy of one hard disk drive (HDD) onto another drive, thereby providing an excellent backup function, as well as the ability to upgrade drives, such as going to a higher capacity drive and/or from an HDD to a solid state drive (SSD) or solid state hybrid drive (SSHD).

1. Download the Trial Edition


Visit the Casper website at:

https://www.fssdev.com/products/casper/trial/

Click one of the download links:

download links

2. Install casper_se_trial_setup.exe

After downloading, run the installer. FSS offers a free 30-day trial, but keep in mind that the trial edition does not have the volume resizing feature. The licensed product does have it, meaning Casper can clone to the same size drive or to a larger one or even to a smaller one, as long as there is enough space on the smaller one to house the used (non-free) space from the larger one. The licensed product is not free, but is reasonably priced, in my opinion:

http://www.fssdev.com/shop/

3. Run Casper and click on the Copy Drive icon

This performs the cloning operation.
copy drive

4. Select the drive you want to copy

Casper will display a list of all drives on the system:
source drivesSelect the source drive, that is, the one you want to clone, and click the Next button.

5. Select the destination drive

Casper will display a list of the drives on the system that are capable of housing the clone:
destination driveSelect the destination drive, that is, the one you want to receive the clone, and click the Next button.

6. Confirm the overwrite warning

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Expert Comment

by:Abraham Deutsch
Its the standard (non-server) edition
When a restore is need I would like to get back the entire computer, even if for performance purposes I would split the OS (SSD) and files on two disks but for backup, I would expect that one disk (SATA) should be enough. especially when recommended to have to copy's of each backup. Just my opinion.
0
 
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi Abraham,
If I'm understanding it right, you want to backup two separate disks (one with the OS, one with data) onto a single backup disk that can house multiple backups (you said, "to copy's of each backup", by which I assume you meant "two copies of each backup"). You can't do that with cloning, which, by its very nature, makes an exact copy of one disk (all partitions/volumes) onto another disk. For your requirement, I recommend imaging, not cloning. Run a job that makes an image for the OS disk and run another job that makes an image for the data disk. Store all of the images on your single backup disk, which, as you said, should be large enough to house multiple images. I have a client who does this on an 8TB NAS (4TB available — it is mirrored). Works very well! Regards, Joe
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Windows Vista

22K

Solutions

23K

Contributors

Windows Vista is an operating system created by Microsoft as the successor to Windows XP. It was intended for PCs, workstations and laptops, and shares the same code base as its successor, Windows 7. New features included an updated graphical user interface (GUI) and visual style dubbed Aero, a new search component called Windows Search, redesigned networking, audio, print and display subsystems, and new multimedia tools. Vista aimed to increase the level of communication between machines on a home network, using peer-to-peer technology to simplify sharing files and media between computers and devices. Windows Vista included version 3.0 of the .NET Framework, allowing software developers to write applications without traditional Windows APIs.

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Windows Vista