Windows XP

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Microsoft Windows XP is the sixth release of the NT series of operating systems, and was the first to be marketed in a variety of editions: XP Home and XP Professional, designed for business and power users. The advanced features in XP Professional are generally disabled in Home Edition, but are there and can be activated. There were two 64-bit editions, an embedded edition and a tablet edition.

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AOMEI Backupper Pro (Cloning software)
Two types of users will appreciate AOMEI Backupper Pro:

1 - Those with PCIe drives (and haven't found cloning software that works on them).
2 - Those who want a fast clone of their boot drive (no re-boots needed) and it can clone your drive while other apps are running.

If interested, be warned: AOMEI is $50 (USD) for 2 PCs and is paid to a 3rd party. AOMEI will email the key and a download link. If you lose the key or the link, then it's $50 for nada as there is no way to get the link without another purchase and if you lose the key, AOMEI doesn't file it.
It works with all versions of Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, 8.1 and 10.

1. Mount the clones destination drive first.

AOMEI will not find the destination drive unless it was installed before launching AOMEI Backupper Pro.

2. Select Clone on AOMEI's main menu, and 'System Clone' on the sub menu

AOMEI will automatically select your system (boot) drive as source and will provide a menu of candidate target drives it finds. (Your target drive can exist on any port the BIOS recognizes and Windows can assign a drive letter to.)

3. Considering the target drive's size

The target drive size must be "adequately sized", that is larger than the total of all the boot drive's non-boot partitions (MBR or GUID) plus # of bytes used on the boot partition. (My boot-drive is C: 400GB but I only use about 60GB, and two 450MB GUID partitions that Windows 10 created. So I can clone to a 120 GB drive easily and successfully. When cloning to larger drives, it creates an extra MBR partition. Use AOMEI's Partition Assistant SE (free) if you want to join the partitions.
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Expert Comment

by:Kyle Santos
Ed,

Great video.  I actually just shared this video to someone I know who was trying to do this the other day!
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Expert Comment

by:Helen Green
Thanks for sharing us this useful software. However, there are two aspects which the editor made a mistake:
1.      If you purchased the software but somehow lost the download link especially the key, you can surely get it back by email AOMEI customer support team (support@aomeitech.com) with your purchase ID, the email address you filled when place your order. See its purchase FAQ at http://www.backup-utility.com/purchase-faq.html
2.      This is about the third step of the video. Yes, you can clone to a smaller disk only if the destination disk is no small than the used space of your original disk; this is based-on intelligent sector clone mode. However, if you choose sector-by-sector mode, the destination disk must be no small than the capacity (not used space) of the original disk. Besides, when cloning to larger drives, you can edit partition size directly in AOMEI Backupper; there’s no need of using AOMEI Partition Assistant though it’s a professional and powerful partition management tool. See more details at http://www.backup-utility.com/features/partition-volume-clone.html
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How to remove "Get Windows 10" icon from the notification area (system tray) - Part 2
With the advent of Windows 10, Microsoft is pushing a Get Windows 10 icon into the notification area (system tray) of qualifying computers. There are many reasons for wanting to remove this icon. This two-part Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial series explains several techniques for doing that. In the previous Part 1, we discussed three techniques. Each of them works to remove the icon when initially performed, but some users report that the icon returns. In this Part 2, we discuss a fourth technique, which involves changing the registry. It has received no reports yet of the icon returning. We also provide a pre-built .REG file (attached in the steps below) that will easily and safely remove the Get Windows 10 icon from the notification area. Likewise, we attached another pre-built .REG file that will easily and safely restore the Get Windows 10 icon to the notification area, in the event that you want to utilize it at some point in the future.

1. Run the Registry Editor


If you prefer a safe, tested, simple, double-click method, skip to Step 6. If you prefer to modify the registry manually, follow Steps 1-5, beginning with this:

Start button
Run
regedit

Step1

2. Find the path to add a new GWX key


Expand the Registry Editor keys as follows:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE
SOFTWARE
Policies
Microsoft
Windows

Step2

3. Add a key called GWX


Click the key that you just navigated to, that is:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows

With that key selected/highlighted, click the Edit menu, then New>Key. Create a new key called GWX.

step3.jpg

4. Add a DWORD called DisableGWX

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Expert Comment

by:Jesse Mora
Thanks for sharing this with us, this fixed the issue in seeing this annoying message not only on my personal laptop but in our company desktop and laptops as well.

Thanks once again.

Best Regards,
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Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
You're welcome. And thanks to you for letting me know that it worked for you — I really appreciate hearing that! Regards, Joe
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How to remove "Get Windows 10" icon from the notification area (system tray) - Part 1
With the advent of Windows 10, Microsoft is pushing a Get Windows 10 icon into the notification area (system tray) of qualifying computers. There are many reasons for wanting to remove this icon. This two-part Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial series explains several techniques for doing that. In this Part 1, we discuss three techniques: (i) hiding the icon, (ii) uninstalling the relevant Windows update, and (iii) disabling tasks in the Task Scheduler. They all work to remove the icon when initially performed, but some users report that the icon returns. The fourth technique, which is explained in Part 2 of the series, involves changing the registry and has received no reports yet of the icon returning.

1. Technique 1 - Hide icon


Right-click on an empty spot on the taskbar and then click Properties (or open Control Panel and run the Taskbar and Start Menu applet)

The Taskbar tab should already be selected, but if not, click it.

Step1

2. Change icon behavior from Show to Hide


Click the Customize... button.

Find the GWX entry in the list.

Click the drop-down arrow and change the behavior from Show icon and notifications to Hide icon and notifications.

Click OK.

Note: This approach works only if the check-box "Always show all icons and notifications on the taskbar" is un-ticked.

Step2

3. Technique 2 - Uninstall Windows update KB3035583


KB3035583 is the update that installs the Get Windows 10
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How to use the Windows Task Scheduler - An Introduction
The Task Scheduler is a powerful tool that is built into Windows. It allows you to schedule tasks (actions) on a recurring basis, such as hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, at log on, at startup, on idle, etc. This video Micro Tutorial is a brief introduction to the Task Scheduler. It was inspired by a recent question here at Experts Exchange from a member who wants to play a different song at four different times during the day (every day). The video uses that as the example, but the intention of the video is to explain the general creation of periodic tasks that can cover a broad range of user requirements. The video was produced in Windows 10, but the Task Scheduler user interface is nearly the same in Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 (the Task Scheduler exists in Windows XP with similar functionality, but the user interface is different).

1. Run the Task Scheduler


In Windows 10, click the Start button and start typing task scheduler. By the time you get to the letter "k", you should see the Task Scheduler choice — click it.

There are different ways to run the Task Scheduler. For example, in Windows 7:
Start
All Programs
Accessories
System Tools
Task Scheduler


Step1

2. Create a new folder for your own tasks


Make sure Task Scheduler Library is selected/highlighted in the left pane (it should already be).

Click New Folder... in the Actions pane on the right, then give the new folder a name.

Step2

3. Create a new task in your new folder


Expand the Task Scheduler Library and select/highlight your new folder.

Click Create Task... in the Actions
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Expert Comment

by:Michael Okopedeghe
Thanks very Helpful and easy to follow.
Mike
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LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
You're welcome, Mike. And thanks to you for joining EE today, reading my article, and endorsing it — much appreciated! Regards, Joe
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Make Windows 10 Look Like Earlier Versions of Windows with Classic Shell
Windows 8 came with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from that interface was a Start button and Start Menu. Microsoft responded to negative user feedback of the Metro interface, bringing back the Start button and Start Menu in Windows 10. However, even though there are widespread reports that users like the Windows 10 interface better than the Windows 8 one, many users still prefer the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows XP, and even (my personal favorite) Windows 2000. This video Micro Tutorial explains how to achieve the W7, XP, or 2K interface on your Windows 10 computer with an excellent, free product called Classic Shell.
Windows 8 came with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from that interface was a Start button and Start Menu. Microsoft responded to negative user feedback of the Metro interface, bringing back the Start button and Start Menu in Windows 10. However, even though there are widespread reports that users like the Windows 10 interface better than the Windows 8 one, many users still prefer the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows XP, and even (my personal favorite) Windows 2000. This video Micro Tutorial explains how to achieve the Windows 7 or Windows XP or Windows 2000 interface on your Windows 10 computer with an excellent, free product called Classic Shell.

1. Download the installer for the software


Visit the Classic Shell website at:
http://www.classicshell.net/

Click the Download Now
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Expert Comment

by:Ramin
Very Good Tutorial.
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LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi Ramin,
Thank you for the compliment — I really appreciate it! Regards, Joe
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Move the Taskbar to Create Additional Vertical Screen Space
In this video, we discuss why the need for additional vertical screen space has become more important in recent years, namely, due to the transition in the marketplace of 4x3 computer screens to 16x9 and 16x10 screens (so-called widescreen format). We then explain how to increase the vertical screen space by moving the taskbar off the bottom of the screen to the left side of the screen. We show this in Windows 7, but the technique also works in XP, Vista, and Windows 8.

1. Access the Taskbar Properties.

There are two ways to access the Taskbar Properties.

The first is to right-click in an open space on the taskbar, which brings up a context menu. From the context menu, select "Properties" and this will show all options related to the Taskbar (and Start Menu).

Alternatively, the easier way to get to the Properties is via your Control Panel. Open Control Panel and select the "Taskbar and Start Menu" applet. This will show the same options as the first method.
context menu

2. Try out the Auto-hide feature.

Auto-hide will allow the Taskbar to hide when you are not near it.

To enable this feature, tick the "Auto-hide the taskbar" box in Properties and click "Apply". Move the mouse towards the bottom of the screen to see how distracting Auto-hide is (and why many users don't like it).

After trying it, un-tick the "Auto-hide the taskbar" box in Properties and click "Apply" again.

auto-hide

3. Review the time and date display by hovering the mouse over the time on the far right side of the Taskbar.

This shows the day of the week and date in a pop-up bubble. This functionality will change once we move our Taskbar to the left.
date and time

4. Return to your Taskbar Properties.

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Make Windows 8 Look Like Earlier Versions of Windows with Classic Shell
Windows 8 comes with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from the new interface is a Start button and Start Menu. Many users do not like it, much preferring the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows XP, and even (my personal favorite) Windows 2000. This video Micro Tutorial explains how to achieve the W7, XP, or 2K interface on your Windows 8 computer with an excellent, free product called Classic Shell.

1. Download the installer for the software



Visit the Classic Shell website at:

http://www.classicshell.net/

Click the Download Now button.

Save the downloaded installer (ClassicShellSetup_latest_version_number.exe) wherever you want.

Step1.jpg

2. Run the installer



Locate the downloaded installer in Windows/File Explorer (or whatever file manager you use) and run it.

Step2.jpg

3. Select the options



There are four main options: Classic Explorer, Classic Start Menu, Classic IE, Classic Shell Update. It defaults to installing all four, but you may select whichever ones you want.

Step3.jpg

4. Complete the setup wizard



You will now have a Start button and Start Menu.

Step4.jpg

5. Right-click on the new Start button and select Settings



There are many tabs in Settings. Click each of them and select whichever settings you want. Examples are the Start Menu Style tab, where you may select the Windows 7 or Windows XP or Windows 2000 interface, and the Windows 8 Settings tab, where you may Skip Metro screen upon startup, thereby bringing you straight into the desktop.

Step5.jpg

6. Left-click the new Start button



You will now have whatever interface you selected, i.e., W7, XP, or 2K.

Step6.jpg
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Expert Comment

by:gwiensx
When I recently purchased my inexpensive Dell desktop machine, it came with Windows 8.something. As I quickly discovered, it was designed around touch-screen technology, and I became frustrated very quickly.

Fortunately, I ran across Classic Shell which does a pretty good job hiding the deplorable Win 8 UI. I don't know what M$ was thinking, but they lost me way back as with each release, more eye candy and less functionality.

Thanks for the shell!
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LVL 55

Author Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Hi gwiensx,
You're welcome! And thanks to you for the feedback. I'm glad that Classic Shell makes your new W8 machine more usable — I wouldn't be without it on my W8 computers. Btw, if you found this video to be helpful, please take a moment to click the Good Video Micro Tutorial? button underneath the video window above — I'll really appreciate it! Thanks, Joe
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Windows XP

118K

Solutions

78K

Contributors

Microsoft Windows XP is the sixth release of the NT series of operating systems, and was the first to be marketed in a variety of editions: XP Home and XP Professional, designed for business and power users. The advanced features in XP Professional are generally disabled in Home Edition, but are there and can be activated. There were two 64-bit editions, an embedded edition and a tablet edition.