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Xpdf - Command Line Utility for PDF Files - Part 1

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Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVE
50+ years in computer industry. Everything from development to sales. CIO. Document imaging. EE MVE 2015, EE MVE 2016, EE FELLOW 2017.
In this first video of the three-part Xpdf series, we introduce and describe Xpdf, a library containing nine command line utilities that perform various functions on PDF files. We show where the library is located and how to download it, discuss its licensing provisions, and provide a brief description of each of the nine modules. We set the stage for the following two Micro Tutorials in the Xpdf series — one on the PDFimages tool and the other on PDFtoText.

Video Steps

1. Download and install the software.

Visit the Xpdf website at:

http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

Click the Download link and then click the pre-compiled Windows binary ZIP archive to download the Xpdf utilities for Windows.
precompiled binaries

2. Read the licensing agreements.

Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file.

Read the licensing agreements, which are in plain text files called COPYING (which is GNU GPL V2) and COPYING3 (which is GNU GPL V3) in the root of the unzipped archive.
licensing

3. If you need commercial licensing, visit the parent company's website.

For commercial licensing, visit the Glyph & Cog website:

http://www.glyphandcog.com/
glyph & cog

4. Locate the folder with the documentation.

Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the subfolder called <doc>.
documentation folder

5. Read all of the documentation.

Go into the <doc> folder and read the documentation. All of the files are plain text files that may be opened with any text editor, such as Notepad, or any software that can open a text file, such as Word or WordPad.
documentation

6. Locate the executables for the utilities.

Go to the folder where you unzipped the downloaded ZIP file and find the subfolders called <bin32> and <bin64>. These contain the EXE files for all nine of the utilities. In nearly all cases, the 32-bit modules will work fine, even on 64-bit Windows. The only times that you may need to use the 64-bit binaries are with PDFtoPPM or PDFtoPS, and only in those cases where the tool needs to allocate very large blocks of memory.
executables

7. Join me for the next videos in the series

That's it for the introduction to the Xpdf utilities. Please join me for the other videos in this Xpdf series. And if you find this video to be helpful, please click the thumbs-up icon below. Thank you for watching!
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