Windows Server 2012 – Configuring as an iSCSI Target

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This tutorial will walk an individual through the process of installing the necessary services and then configuring a Windows Server 2012 system as an iSCSI target.

Video Steps

1. To install the necessary roles, go to Server Manager, and select Add Roles and Features either from the home screen or click Manage and select the option

2. Click Next, accepting all defaults until the Server Roles selection pane is displayed. Expand File and Storage Service, then File and iSCSI Services. Place a check in the box by iSCSI Target Server. Click Next.

3. Click Next through the Features screen and review the summary report. Then click Install.

4. Once installed, launch Server Manager. From the dashboard, select File and Storage on the left panel.

5. Click on iSCSI, and select To Create an iSCSI virtual disk, start the New iSCSI Virtual Disk Wizard in the middle of the screen

6. Select the desired volume then, click Next

7. Provide a name for the disk and a description if desired, click Next

8. Select a size for the disk, then decide whether it will be either a fixed size or dynamically adjusting, click Next

9. Select the option to create a new target, click Next

10. Provide a name for the target and a description if desired, click Next

11. Select Add to add those servers with access rights to this target. You can either select from existing initiators or browse to locate and query any new ones. Click OK, click Next.

12. If authentication is desired, enter the CHAP information, otherwise click Next

13. Review the summary screen. If all of the information is correct, then click Create

14. Once created, the disk should begin initializing. This should be visible on the iSCSI Virtual Disk screen


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