RunDll: Error in NVCPL.DLL On Startup

jyk_aus
jyk_aus used Ask the Experts™
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I attempted an optional Windows Update that updates the display driver (NVIDIA GeoForce GT 220) which has failed with a message that the BIOS needs to be updated. I updated the BIOS but still that update failed to install, leaving my display in VGA mode.

I rolled the driver back successfully but I now get the following message on startup:

Error In NVCPL.DLL
Missing Entry: NvStartupRunOnFirstSessionUserAccout

I understand that NVCPL.DLL is NVidia control panel and whilst it loads it is all grayed out, in other words,useless.

I downloaded (another) driver from Nvidia site  which installed, seemingly successfully but the error still persists, restoring the (original) driver using HP built-in facility did not work;  removing Nvidia from the startup (with msconfig) did not do the trick either.

My guess is that there is a missing entry in the registry but I cannot find trustful advice as to how to restore it, if indeed it is the problem.

Does anyone here has a solution to this problem? I am trying to avoid a clean-install of Windows which is at least two day work bringing my computer back to its currect state.

Specs:
Windows Vista Home Premium 64bits fully patched
Processor:      Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad  CPU   Q8200  @ 2.33GHz, 2336 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)
BIOS Version/Date:      American Megatrends Inc. 5.05, 04/06/09
SMBIOS Version:      2.5
Display Card: Nvidia GeoForce GT 220

Thanks in advance
Jacob


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zeshanazizSystem Administrator
Commented:
The error you are getting is form the first run of the nvidia Control panel. It is a registry key that is added to make sure the nvidia control panel starts at least once you know the little system trey icon. You can remove the registry key or uncheck the box in MSconfig or Autoruns. I would prefer anyone doing this use autoruns, it is a better choice. If you edit MSConfig directly you will disable system restore, since it will put the OS in a diagnostic mode. Autoruns will just edit the registry for you and its free.
Autoruns: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinte...s/bb963902.aspx 

To fix this in autoruns:

1. Donwload the zip file from the link
2. Extract the files to a folder
3. Run autoruns.exe as administrator (win 7 and vista)
4. Click on the Logon tab
5. Uncheck the box for
"HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run"
NvCplDaemon NVIDIA Display Properties Extension NVIDIA Corporation c:\windows\system32\nvcpl.dll
6. Close the window and you should be good, next reboot you should not see the error.
zeshanazizSystem Administrator
Commented:
if problem persist then plz visit
http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=102473

Commented:
I would go to Add/Remove programs and remove any Nvidia software then restart.
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Author

Commented:
Thank you Zeshaziz and Edbedb for your prompt replies.

I am still at it so this is just a progress report; Autorun did not do the trick - I followed the instructions on the Nvidia forum using DriverSweeper, still no luck - what appears to happen is that the newer version of the driver, the one that does not like my BIOS, is attempting to install and failing taking me back to square one.

I will revert shortly.

Jacob


Author

Commented:
Further,

No luck!

I uninstalled the driver and used DriverSweeper in safe mode a number of times to no avail. As soon as I restart windows, it installs the driver that does not like my Bios, I reinstall the original driver manually and I am back to square one, EXCEPT that Nvidia control panel is now working OK.

Any more suggestions?



Commented:
Use this URL and enter the info for the adapter and OS then download whatever version you need.
http://www.nvidia.com/Download/Find.aspx?lang=en-us 

Author

Commented:
Thanks Ededb,

I had already done that  to no avail - this is the "(another) driver from Nvidia site" that I mention in my original post. In fact it is the one that asks me to upgrade my BIOS although I had already done that too.

Jacob

Commented:
I don't understand. There are around 20 different versions of drivers for that adapter.

Author

Commented:
True, actually 9 when we omit beta versions, I did not try them all but I noticed that even those drivers that installed seemingly successfully did not eliminate the error message. The same goes for the driver that came with the computer.

Although the problem appeared after a failure of a driver to install, subsequent successful installs do not resolve it. It seems that removing-cleaning-reinstalling the driver is not the solution, such operation bypasses the cause for the message, whatever it is.

I shall leave this question open for another few days to see whether a solution emerges, failing which I will, in all probability, clean-reinstall Windows, something that I usually do once a year in any event; this computer is due  for a clean up around mid November which is not too far off.



Commented:
Did you try what I suggested at the beginning?
"I would go to Add/Remove programs and remove any Nvidia software then restart."

Author

Commented:
Yes a number of times; I removed the Nvidia driver in the "Add/Remove programs" section in Safe Mode, which also automatically removes the control panel, cleaned any remnants of the driver with a program called "DriverSweeper" and rebooted.

As soon as I reboot, Windows try to install the driver that fails to install thus I manually re-install the original driver (that came with the computer) after the failure, but that of course it is too late, once a driver fail to install the error that is causing the message is re-introduced, assuming that the cleanup was effective, something that I am not sure about either.

If there is a way to stop Windows from automatically installing hardware drivers on reboot, or changing the driver that is installed by default, I might be there with a chance, but I don't know of way to stop it or whether it can be done at all.



Commented:
This is what I would do. Uninstall all the Nvidia software and drivers. Restart the computer in safe mode, and using the registry editor search for NVCPL.DLL
Post back with the results and if found where.

Commented:
Also, let me know if you need help doing that.

Author

Commented:
Success! :-)

I am not quite sure what exactly did the trick; as you suggested, I removed the driver and  the control panel in "add/Remove programs" and also something called "Nvidia Phyx" (or similar name), I then restarted in safe mode which (of course!!!) did not automatically installed the offending driver.

I used DriverSweeper to clean Nvidia leftover of the driver and then went into the registry and whilst there was no NVCPL.DLL in the registry, there were quite a few other NVidia entries; I removed them all except those in ClassID's. Amogst the entries I removed, there was one which pointed to the location of the "bad" driver (the one that fail the install).

I also noticed that uninstalling Nvidia left its directory in "Program Files (x86)" with quite a bit of stuff in it -- I deleted it.

I then re-boot, again in safe mode, and manually installed the original driver (that came with the computer) and ... bingo!

I noticed that "Nvidia Physx" did not return to "Add/Remove Programs", I guess that was put there by the newer driver that failed to install; it may or may not be the cause for the problem.

I really appreciate your tenacity Edbedb, I had practically decided to clean- reinstall Windows in the next few days, which I can put off now. Had it not be your persistence, I would have probably gone that way.

Thank you very much for your help

Best regards
Jacob



Commented:
Glad to help.

Author

Commented:
Thank You both

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